Triangle Choke: Tips, Guides and Resources

The triangle choke is a submission hold that has become a staple in the world of mixed martial arts (MMA). It involves wrapping one’s legs around an opponent’s neck and arm, putting pressure on the neck and carotid arteries to cause the opponent to tap out or lose consciousness. When executed properly, the triangle choke can be a highly effective technique for ending a fight.

One of the reasons the triangle choke is so popular in MMA is its versatility. It can be executed from a variety of positions, including from the guard, mount, and side control. This makes it a valuable tool to have in one’s submission arsenal, as it can be used to finish a fight or to control an opponent. Additionally, the triangle choke can be used to transition into other submissions, such as the armbar or omoplata.

However, executing the triangle choke can be challenging, as it requires a combination of technique, timing, and flexibility. It is important to practice the technique under the guidance of a qualified instructor and to drill the move regularly to develop the necessary muscle memory. With dedication and practice, the triangle choke can become a highly effective weapon in an MMA fighter’s arsenal.

What is a Triangle Choke?

A triangle choke is a submission hold used in mixed martial arts (MMA) and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ). It is a versatile and deadly technique that can be applied from various positions, including the guard, mount, and side control.

The Mechanics of a Triangle Choke

To apply a triangle choke, the fighter wraps their legs around the opponent’s neck and arm, forming a triangle shape with their legs. The fighter then applies pressure by squeezing their legs together and pulling down on the opponent’s head or arm.

The choke works by cutting off the blood flow to the opponent’s brain, causing them to lose consciousness if the choke is not released in time. It can also cause damage to the opponent’s neck and spine if applied with enough force.

Why is it Effective in MMA?

The triangle choke is an effective submission hold in MMA for several reasons. First, it can be applied from various positions, making it a versatile technique that can be used in many situations.

Second, it is a high-percentage submission hold, meaning that it has a high success rate when applied correctly. This is because the choke is difficult for the opponent to escape once it is locked in, and it can be applied quickly and with little warning.

Finally, the triangle choke is a relatively safe submission hold compared to other techniques like arm bars or heel hooks, which can cause serious injury if applied incorrectly. This makes it a popular technique among MMA fighters who want to avoid injuring their opponents unnecessarily.

Overall, the triangle choke is a powerful and effective submission hold that every MMA fighter should have in their arsenal. By understanding the mechanics of the choke and why it is effective in MMA, fighters can become more well-rounded and dangerous fighters in the cage.

How to Perform a Triangle Choke

A triangle choke is a submission hold that is applied from the guard position in MMA. It involves trapping your opponent’s head and one arm with your legs to create a triangle, and then applying pressure to the neck to cut off their blood supply and make them submit. Here’s a breakdown of the basic steps involved in executing a triangle choke:

Setting up the Position

To begin setting up your triangle choke, you need to be in the guard position. From there, you need to control your opponent’s posture by keeping their head down and their arms close to their body. You can do this by holding onto their head with one hand and their arm with the other hand.

Next, you need to create an opening for the triangle choke by lifting your hips and bringing one leg up and over your opponent’s shoulder. This leg should be placed behind your opponent’s head, while your other leg remains wrapped around their waist.

Executing the Submission

Once you have your opponent in the triangle position, you need to lock in the choke. To do this, you need to bring your free leg across your opponent’s neck and place your foot on their hip. You should then grab onto your shin with both hands and pull down on your opponent’s head to create pressure on their neck.

To finish the choke, you need to adjust your position and squeeze your legs together to cut off your opponent’s blood supply. You should also continue to pull down on their head to create more pressure. Your opponent should eventually tap out to signal their submission.

In summary, to perform a triangle choke, you need to be in the guard position, create an opening for the choke, lock in the choke, and finish the submission by squeezing your legs together and pulling down on your opponent’s head. With practice and proper technique, you can use this versatile and deadly submission to defeat your opponents in MMA.

Countering the Triangle Choke

The triangle choke is a versatile and deadly submission technique in MMA that can be applied from various positions. However, it can also be countered effectively with proper technique and awareness. In this section, we will discuss some ways to prevent the setup and escape the submission.

Preventing the Setup

The best way to counter the triangle choke is to prevent your opponent from setting it up in the first place. Here are some tips to help you do that:

  • Maintain posture: One of the most common ways to set up a triangle choke is to break your posture and control your head. Therefore, it’s important to maintain good posture and keep your head up.
  • Stay active: If you’re too passive, your opponent will have an easier time setting up the triangle choke. Stay active and keep moving to make it harder for them to control you.
  • Watch for the setup: Be aware of your opponent’s movements and watch for any signs that they might be setting up the triangle choke. If you see them trying to control your head or legs, take action to defend against it.

Escaping the Submission

If your opponent has already locked in the triangle choke, there are still ways to escape the submission. Here are some techniques to help you do that:

  • Posture up: If your opponent has locked in the triangle choke, the first thing you should do is posture up. This will help to relieve the pressure on your neck and make it harder for them to finish the submission.
  • Create space: To escape the triangle choke, you need to create space between your neck and your opponent’s leg. You can do this by pushing their knee down and away from your head.
  • Rotate your body: Another way to escape the triangle choke is to rotate your body towards the trapped arm. This will help to relieve the pressure on your neck and make it harder for your opponent to finish the submission.

In conclusion, countering the triangle choke requires good technique and awareness. By preventing the setup and escaping the submission, you can defend against this deadly technique and gain an advantage in the fight.

Famous Examples in MMA

The triangle choke is a popular submission technique in MMA, and many fighters have used it to secure victories in the octagon. Here are some notable examples of fighters and moments in MMA history involving the triangle choke:

Notable Fighters Who Have Used the Triangle Choke

  • Demian Maia: Maia is known for his exceptional Brazilian jiu-jitsu skills, and the triangle choke is one of his signature moves. He has used it to finish several opponents in the UFC, including Carlos Condit and Chael Sonnen.
  • Tony Ferguson: Ferguson is another fighter who is known for his grappling ability, and he has used the triangle choke to great effect in his career. He famously submitted Kevin Lee with a triangle choke in the third round of their UFC 216 bout.
  • Nate Diaz: Diaz is a skilled Brazilian jiu-jitsu practitioner, and he has used the triangle choke to finish several opponents in the UFC, including Kurt Pellegrino and Marcus Davis.

Memorable Moments in MMA History Involving the Triangle Choke

  • Royce Gracie vs. Dan Severn: At UFC 4 in 1994, Royce Gracie secured a triangle choke on Dan Severn in the finals of the tournament to win the event. The finish was particularly memorable because Severn was a much larger and stronger opponent than Gracie, but Gracie was able to use his technique to secure the victory.
  • Anderson Silva vs. Chael Sonnen: In their rematch at UFC 148 in 2012, Anderson Silva was able to secure a triangle choke on Chael Sonnen in the second round to retain his middleweight title. The finish was notable because Sonnen had dominated Silva for much of the fight up until that point.
  • Brian Ortega vs. Cub Swanson: At UFC Fight Night 123 in 2017, Brian Ortega secured a triangle choke on Cub Swanson in the second round of their main event bout. The finish was particularly impressive because Swanson had never been submitted in his professional career prior to that fight.

In conclusion, the triangle choke is a versatile and effective submission technique in MMA, and many fighters have used it to great effect in their careers. From Demian Maia to Anderson Silva, the triangle choke has played a significant role in some of the most memorable moments in MMA history.

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